Talk:Berlin court: neutrality law above German religious freedom, bans teacher headscarves in primary school

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HeadlineEdit

@Green Giant: In discussion (elsewhere), we were considering as alternatives for the headline either

Berlin court says neutrality law above Germany's religious freedom, bans teachers from wearing headscarves in primary school

or, possibly,

Berlin court says neutrality law above Germany's religious freedom, bans teacher headscarves in primary school

--Pi zero (talk) 23:56, 11 May 2018 (UTC)

I was thinking something like the second one. Green Giant (talk) 00:05, 12 May 2018 (UTC)
@Pi zero: I find addition of colon beating the purpose of you moving it at the first place. Well, I am not quite convinced what you were trying to tell me about the colon because we hardly spoke about it. But I find this one somewhat similar yet more specific as compared to the original one; as if it concerns only the people from Berlin; and we didn’t discuss much about it on IRC, so I don’t know what you think of it. I would have preferred “Berlin court pronounces” because it mentioned country as well as did not diminish the preciseness.
•–• 04:20, 12 May 2018 (UTC)
I made the remarks above since Green Giant already had the article {{under review}} at the time. I would have gone for a verb in place of the colon, I think, but Green Giant's choice works too. Green Giant's version does mention the country, I note, though saving a few characters by using the adjectival form rather than the possessive, "German" rather than "Germany's". --Pi zero (talk) 04:36, 12 May 2018 (UTC)
That was one of the versions I thought, but I am still not convinced about the colon, what you were trying to say; maybe we will discuss it when my mind is empty.
•–• 04:42, 12 May 2018 (UTC)
If the colon is kept, the next letter should be capitalized. --SVTCobra 04:59, 12 May 2018 (UTC)
Should it? I recall, from ages ago when I first got my copy of the Chicago Manual of Style and made a valiant attempt to read it straight through (so I'd have been exposed once to everything in it), they recommended following a colon with an upper-case letter if the colon is meant to apply to multiple sentences (to the end of a paragraph), or a lower-case letter if the colon is meant to apply only until the next sentence-end. Of course, that rule pertains to a colon within text that's divided into paragraphs and sentences, whereas a headline is inherently single-sentence; but it does offer some support for a lower-case letter. --Pi zero (talk) 13:42, 12 May 2018 (UTC)
I don't have the reference materials at hand, but it is my recollection that full sentences after a colon would call for a capital letter. I think what you are citing is when using colons in the body of the work. In a title, I would be inclined to capitalize even if it's just a list of items. [Not that that should occur with our call for an active voice]. The use of a colon in a title makes what follows a subtitle, which should follow the same rules as a stand-alone title. --SVTCobra 14:11, 12 May 2018 (UTC)
I also believe we have been following that rule, consciously or not. See: United States: Two killed, more than a hundred injured in Amtrak train collision in South Carolina and United States: Four injured in Los Angeles school shooting. --SVTCobra 14:19, 12 May 2018 (UTC)

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