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Talk:Samsung's 4 Gigabit flash memory begins mass production

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It will be several years before Flash memory cards become cheap enough to be used in laptops. Furthermore, hard disk technology will probably always be ahead of Flash memory in terms of cost per gigabyte and access speed, so they will probably never replace hard disks in laptops. Finally, while Flash memory is just approaching the speeds that are needed for HDTV playback, hard disks are already much faster than is needed for that purpose, and several of these 4Gib flash cards put together into a small package (512MiB each) will NOT provide enough room for HDTV. Although I can see the use of Flash memory in more handheld devices where hard drives are currently used (especially ones with low-capacity hard drives such as LifeDrive PDAs and digital music players), I think that Samsung's claims are little more than marketing hype. Andrew pmk 15:46, 4 Jun 2005 (UTC)

I wouldn't bet on it. HDDs have stagnated at about 250gb -> $1 = 1 gb. Thats a hell of a lot better than anything offered by flash at the moment BUT, the advances of solid state are going forward in leaps and bounds. The current limit is about 2 gb, this is talking about 16gb. that is a MASSIVE increase 16gb is suddenly enough to carry your entire OS, progrmas and large number of files. We could well see people carrying around thier entire computer on a usb key and just plug it into what ever computer is closest. Any computer is your computer. Your work computer and your home computer are one. It would be massive. ~The bellman | Smile 13:14, 13 Jun 2005 (UTC)

It would also appear that SanDisk (not aware of the actual manufacturer) has an 8GB Compact Flash card available on the retail market so only a month since the last comment and we are already halfway to 16GB.--68.94.193.10 10:56, 24 July 2005 (UTC)

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'a a' => 'a' Van der Hoorn (talk) 19:15, 25 February 2009 (UTC)

  DoneGopher65talk 01:55, 7 March 2009 (UTC)

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