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News briefs:June 17, 2010

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'Bloody Sunday Inquiry' publishes report into British Army killing of activists in Northern IrelandEdit

Thank you for downloading the Audio Wikinews Brief. Today is Thursday, June 17th, 2010. I'm Dan Harlow and today we present a special report on the Bloody Sunday Inquiry, a report into the 1972 British Army killing of fourteen civil rights activists in Northern Ireland.

The Saville Inquiry, a 12-year public inquiry into the fatal shooting known as Bloody Sunday, published a long awaited 5,000 page report, concluded the deaths were "unjustified".

The events of "Bloody Sunday" in 1972 saw soldiers open fire on civilians during a civil rights march. Family members and supporters of the victims reacted positively to the report, as they gathering outside the Guildhall in Derry.

"What happened on Bloody Sunday was both unjustified and unjustifiable. It was wrong", British Prime Minister David Cameron told the House of Commons. He also said, "[t]he Government is ultimately responsible for the conduct of the armed forces, and for that, on behalf of the Government, indeed on behalf of our country, I am deeply sorry".

Cameron said the Saville report states that those killed did not pose a threat and some of those killed and injured were clearly fleeing or going to help those injured or dying.

Some of the key findings were;

"The firing by soldiers of 1 Para caused the deaths of 13 people and injury to a similar number, none of whom was posing a threat of causing death or serious injury"; Accounts by soldiers were rejected and some had "knowingly put forward false accounts"; The paratroopers shot first and later members of the official IRA fired a number of shots but this “did not provide an explanation for why soldiers targeted and hit people” and Northern Ireland's Deputy First Minister, Martin McGuinness of Sinn Fein, was "probably armed with a sub-machine gun" on the day, but did not engage in "any activity that provided any of the soldiers with any justification for opening fire".

Twenty-seven civil rights activists were shot by the British Army's Parachute Regiment (of which "1 Para" was identified as the regiment mainly responsible) during an illegal Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association (NICRA) march in the Bogside area of Derry in 1972. The NICRA was an organization, formed in early 1967, which campaigned against discrimination of the Roman Catholic minority in Northern Ireland and had five key demands: "one man, one vote"; an end to gerrymandering, housing discrimination, public authority discrimination and the abolition of the B Specials police reserve.

In the aftermath of Bloody Sunday, an inquiry by the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Widgery, justified British army actions on the day and claimed that many of the activists were armed with guns and nail bombs. Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) leader MP Mark Durkan said, "[t]he families have waited a long time for justice and for a long time the reputations and innocence of their loved ones have been smeared by the findings of Widgery".

The shootings lead to the strengthening of Irish republicans' anti-British army arguments in the Nationalist community and provided the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) with queues of new recruits for its "long war", which resulted in 30 years of The Troubles.

The 12-year inquiry is the longest-running and most expensive public inquiry in British judicial history, costing around £200 million. Around 2,500 people gave testimony, including 505 civilians, nine experts and forensic scientists, 49 journalists, 245 military personnel, 35 paramilitaries or former paramilitaries, 39 politicians and civil servants, seven priests and 33 Royal Ulster Constabulary officers. Evidence included 160 volumes of data with an estimated 30 million words, 13 volumes of photographs, 121 audio tapes and 10 video tapes.

The victims included Patrick Doherty (32), Hugh Gilmour (17), Jackie Duddy (17), John Young (17), Kevin McElhinney (17), Michael Kelly (17), Gerald Donaghey (17), William Nash (19), Michael McDaid (20), Jim Wray (22), William McKinney (27) and Bernard "Barney" McGuigan (41). John Johnston (59) died four months later.



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